Dr. Michael T. Lacey: The Brilliant Mathematics Mind

Dr. Michael Lacey has for the last thirty years been a strong pillar in the development of mathematics as a field.

The 58 years old mathematician is a native of Illinois, USA, where he spent the better part of his early life. After completing high school, he decided to pursue mathematics for his bachelors and master’s levels.

This finally culminated at the University of Illinois- Urbana Champaign- where he did a thesis on probability. Under the watch of Prof. Walter Phillip, Lacey made thorough and productive research on Banach Spaces and Empirical Characteristic Function.

By the time he was being conferred with a Ph.D., Lacey had found solutions to some of the most complex fields of mathematics including the law of the integrated logarithm.

Post-Doctoral Contributions

On top of probability, Lacey has contributed to the advancement of other areas such as harmonic analysis and ergodic theory- two areas that are held with high regard within mathematics circles.

His mentor and partner, Prof. Walter Phillip, has been working hand in hand with Dr. Lacey in solving mathematical theories and hypothetical questions since they were together at the University of Illinois in 1987.

They were also together at the University of North Carolina where they brainstormed to come up with the proof for the Central Limit Theorem. The duo was based at Chapel Hill during the days, with their proof having gone a long way in unlocking some of the most dreaded theorems of the recent times. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CVXnps0AAAAJ&hl=en and http://nyjm.albany.edu/j/2017/23-8.html

Before linking up with Walter Phillip, Dr. Lacey had spent some time lecturing mathematics undergraduate students as well as directing masters and Ph.D. students at Louisiana State University.

Two years into his post-doctoral life, Michael Lacey got a senior position in the mathematics department at Indiana University. During his seven-year spell in the position, he got the privilege of getting the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Among the many accomplishments he made in that that fellowship was to study the bilinear Hilbert transform in entirety.

At the end of it all, he was in the team that solved the transform that was at that time Alberto Calderon’s subject of a conjecture. Another notable member of the team was Christoph Thiele.

Read more: Michael Lacey | Mathalliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia